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ROMAN VILLA FLOOR PLAN : ROMAN VILLA


Roman Villa Floor Plan : Barn Wood Flooring : Floor Plan With Measurements.



Roman Villa Floor Plan





roman villa floor plan






    roman villa
  • A Roman villa is a villa that was built or lived in during the Roman republic and the Roman Empire. A villa was originally a Roman country house built for the upper class.





    floor plan
  • A scale diagram of the arrangement of rooms in one story of a building

  • scale drawing of a horizontal section through a building at a given level; contrasts with elevation

  • (Floor planning) Floorplanning is the act of designing of a floorplan, which is a kind of bird's-eye view of a structure.

  • In architecture and building engineering, a floor plan, or floorplan, is a diagram, usually to scale, showing the relationships between rooms, spaces and other physical features at one level of a structure.











roman villa floor plan - Houses, Villas,




Houses, Villas, and Palaces in the Roman World


Houses, Villas, and Palaces in the Roman World



In Houses, Villas, and Palaces in the Roman World, Alexander G. McKay examines simple houses, mansions, estates, and palatial buildings, and he pays particular attention to accounts of ancient writers that deal with such topics as house design, interiors, furnishings, and gardens. Describing innovative high-rise apartments, her compact civic squares, large public buildings, temples, shopping centers, and commercial areas, he shows that Roman civilization was astonishingly similar to our own. He also discusses the conditions of life in the Roman provinces, where recent discoveries have shed fresh light on private and communal living. McKay has enhanced the text by the inclusion of over 150 illustrations of plans, sites, and reconstructions.










87% (10)





William Ziegler Jr. House - 2 East 63rd Street




William Ziegler Jr. House - 2 East 63rd Street





TROPHY houses have a strange way of sitting empty long after the giga-bucks have passed across the table. So it is with the magnificent Ziegler house, at 2 East 63rd Street, bought by a billionaire entrepreneur in 2005 but still dark and silent.As land values went up on the gold coast running up Fifth Avenue in the 19th century, mansion owners built deeper and deeper and higher and higher, often ending up with five- or six-story shoe boxes with dark interiors lit by distant windows.

But William Ziegler Jr. went low when he built his 75-foot-wide mansion in 1921. Mr. Ziegler was the heir to the Royal Baking Powder Company fortune. He was 14 when his father died in 1905 and left him at least $10 million.

He married in 1912, just after his 21st birthday, and he and his wife, Gladys, first occupied a succession of apartment houses. But in 1919 Mr. Ziegler engaged the architect Frederick Sterner to design a mansion on the site of three old brownstones on 63rd Street just off Fifth Avenue.

Mr. Sterner had revolutionized thinking about New York’s old blocks about a decade earlier, when he renovated a strip of moldy brownstones on 19th Street between Irving Place and Third Avenue into colored-stucco Mediterranean fantasies.

On 63rd Street, Mr. Ziegler put up an entirely new house but, fighting the temptation to maximize use of the land, he built as low as possible: three stories, with a fourth set well back, essentially invisible from the street.

Mr. Sterner rethought the rear of the house, too. Instead of leaving the usual cramped yard in the back of the building, he created an open courtyard in the center and arranged the rooms around, ending up with something along the lines of a Roman villa.

Along the front, the architect put an entry hall on the left and a kitchen and servants’ dining room on the right. Across the middle, there was a living room on the left — perhaps 25 feet by 40 feet — followed by perhaps 25 feet of open courtyard in the center and the dining room on the right. Across the back were two small garden areas flanking a library. The second floor was taken up almost entirely by the Zieglers’ separate bedrooms, each with its own dressing room.

The exterior is lovely — soft limestone or perhaps even marble — with an elaborately carved central entrance but an otherwise plain ground floor, then a second floor facade of noble proportions and a subdued third floor above. With the fourth floor set so far back, the building from most points on the block looks to be only three stories high, and the street is much lighter in that section.

Although the building plans are marked Sterner & Wolfe — a short-lived partnership — most published references indicate that the design was Mr. Sterner’s. The New York Times reported in 1925 that the house had been built with older European fragments: the walls of the library imported from a 16th-century English house, a mantel from Florence and a marble floor from elsewhere in Tuscany.

But the Zieglers found something wanting about their house — or perhaps about their marriage, which ended in 1926.

In 1925, The Real Estate Record and Guide said that Mr. Ziegler had “lavished a fortune on the construction and furnishings of the house, which he occupied one year,” but then announced its sale as an actors’ hospital, to have 300 beds. David Belasco, the theatrical producer, came to inspect it and marveled at the sky-blue ceiling of the main hall, telling The Times, “it almost might have been done by Joseph Urban,” the theatrical designer.

It appears the hospital idea did not materialize, and in 1929 Norman Bailey Woolworth, of the dime-store family, bought the house for his own use; 20 years later, he gave it to the New York Academy of Sciences.

In 2001, the academy put the house on the market, and in 2005 it was bought by Leonard Blavatnik, a financier, for $31.25 million, the Web site propertyshark.com reported. According to the Forbes 400 list, Mr. Blavatnik’s fortune is at least $7 billion.

A spokesman for Mr. Blavatnik, Stanislas Neve de Mevergnies, said that it is owned by an affiliate of Mr. Blavatnik’s company, Access Industries, as an investment — not for Mr. Blavatnik’s use. In the three years since, no plans have been filed for the property and little or nothing has been done, inside or out.

Two years ago, The Times reported that Mr. Blavatnik paid $27 million for an apartment at 998 Fifth Avenue, at 81st Street. According to The New York Observer, he paid more than $52 million the same year for the old Bronfman house, at 15 East 64th Street — although Mr. de Mevergnies says that, too, is owned by an Access Industries affiliate. So Mr. Blavatnik has a growing empire of dwellings.

Nowadays, the exterior of 2 East 63rd Street looks like anything but a residence for the rich. The flagpole and air-conditioners are rusty, paint is peeling in fist-sized patches from the window frames, and it is quite clear that leaks are coming through the cornice. Ind











Beautiful mosaic floor




Beautiful mosaic floor





The Cathedral of Aquileia is one of the most important edifices of Christianity. It is a flat-roofed basilica erected by Patriarch Poppo in 1031 on the site of an earlier church, and rebuilt about 1379 in the Gothic style by Patriarch Marquad.

The facade, in Romanesque-Gothic style, is connected by a portico to the Church of the Pagans, and the remains of the 5th century Baptistry. The interior has a nave and two aisles, with a noteworthy mosaic pavement from the 4th century. The wooden ceiling is from 1526, while the fresco decoration belongs to various ages: from the 4th century in the St. Peter's chapel of the apse area; from the 11th century in the apse itself; from the 12th century in the so-called "Crypt of the Frescoes", under the presbytery, with a cycle depicting the origins of Christianity in Aquileia and the history of St. Hermagoras, first bishop of the city.

Next to the 11th century Romanesque chapel of the Holy Sepulchre, at the beginning of the left aisle, flooring of different ages can be seen: the lowest is from a Roman villa of the age of Augustus; the middle one has a typical cocciopesto pavemente; the upper one, bearing blackening from the Attila's fire, has geometrical decorations.

Externally, behind the 9th century campanile and the apse, is the Cemetery of the Fallen, where ten unnamed soldiers of World War I are buried. Saint Hermangoras is also buried there.


Aquileia, one of the most interesting archeological sites in Italy, is located in the southern part of the Friulian plain, close to the wide Lagoon of Grado. The Roman senate decided its foundation in 181 b.C. and the place was chosen for its strategic position , since it could have been an efficient military stop-over for expeditions to Istria, the Illyrian, and for a strict control over the Iulian-Carnic Alps.

Later on, still maintaining a predominant military role, Aquileia started its trading dealings, especially with the iron and gold mines of the Noricum (the present Carintia and most of Styria).

From the Augustian Age onwards , the town became an important center of commercial exchanges between the Danubian regions and the Mediterranean basin, thanks to its favourable geographic location. In fact it stood in a fertile plain, crossed by a navigable river, the Natissa, which at that time flowed into the Adriatic Sea ; besides, a very functional road network connected Aquileia to the Padanian plain and to Central Europe.

Ships docked at the berths of its river port carrying building material (stones from Istria, marbles from Greece and North Africa), while Istrian products - such as wine, olives, garum (i.e. a sauce made using pickled fish) , and wool - were sold. By land the town received metal ore, cattle, wood, slaves, and rough amber coming from the far Baltic Sea mines.

Trade stimulated the spreading of several artisan activities : there were work-shops specializing in mosaics, in carving arble and strong stones. Factories produced fine baked-clay and glass items.

Also agriculture was profitably practised : grains, fruit - especially grapes for wine-making - were the main products.

The town plan had a rectangular shape, similar to a Roman camp, and was divided into neighbourhoods by parallel and perpendicular roads, following the direction of the cardinal points.
The population living within the boundary walls was cosmopolitan and it is presumed to have come to 70,000 or perhaps to 100,000 inhabitants by the end of the Imperial era ; as a matter of fact Aquileia was considered on of the largest cities of the Roman Empire.

With the spreading of Christianism, Aquileia acquired importance since it was chosen as the official seat for the Patriarch, who would then have such a determining role in the various historical events of Friuli.

In the following centuries Aquileia passed through a period of decadence, overall due to the incursions made by the so-called barbaric peoples. Only in the XI century it enjoyed a new, but short-lasting, period of splendour, thanks to Patriarch Poppo (1019-1042), who had the present basilica rebuilt on the ruins of the previous one.
Under the rule of the Republic of Venice (1420) the temporal power of the patriarchs came to an end and Aquileia got less and less important so to become a country village.

From 1509 to 1918 it was part of the Austrian Empire.

Nowadays Aquileia is a small agricultural centre which doesn't show its past grandeur at first sight. To catch what the town still offers you need to walk through the built-up centre, where you will see the remains of the most important Roman constructions emerge among the modern houses.

Then a careful look at the objects displayed in the museums will be the best way to come to understand the several aspects of daily life as it was in one of the major cities during the Roman Imperial age.









roman villa floor plan








roman villa floor plan




Houses, Villas, and Palaces in the Roman World






In Houses, Villas, and Palaces in the Roman World, Alexander G. McKay examines simple houses, mansions, estates, and palatial buildings, and he pays particular attention to accounts of ancient writers that deal with such topics as house design, interiors, furnishings, and gardens. Describing innovative high-rise apartments, her compact civic squares, large public buildings, temples, shopping centers, and commercial areas, he shows that Roman civilization was astonishingly similar to our own. He also discusses the conditions of life in the Roman provinces, where recent discoveries have shed fresh light on private and communal living. McKay has enhanced the text by the inclusion of over 150 illustrations of plans, sites, and reconstructions.










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